Java

Spring Boot Security Configuration, practically explained – Part3: LDAP Bind Authentication
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Spring Boot Security Configuration, practically explained – Part3: LDAP Bind Authentication

This is the 3rd in a series of posts which focuses on LDAP Authentication, but does not provide any detail on the LDAP itself. Our aim is to demonstrate how you can implement LDAP Authentication with Spring Boot framework, by using either a configurer (via the the ldapAuthentication()) or an authentication provider Bean (the LdapAuthenticationProvider) in a classic Custom Security Configuration class, extending
the WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter

Spring Boot Security: The WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter is not the case anymore
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Spring Boot Security: The WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter is not the case anymore

Using a Custom Security Configuration class based on WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter should not be a case for you anymore. This is because it has been deprecated since Spring Security 5.7.0-M2.
However, if you wish to continue using it for a while, without seeing the warning curly yellow lines in your IDE, then here is a quick solution.

Spring Boot Security Configuration, practically explained – Part1: Starting with Spring Boot Security and Basic HTTP Authentication
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Spring Boot Security Configuration, practically explained – Part1: Starting with Spring Boot Security and Basic HTTP Authentication

The legacy Spring Boot Security Configuration, extending the WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter abstract class, is considered deprecated and is being replaced by a component-based security configuration. However, since the existing coding base is huge, here, we will stick to customization of the WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter, and we will try to provide a better understanding, using practical examples. 

Oracle WebLogic Java Application Server (Developers version) – macOS installation
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Oracle WebLogic Java Application Server (Developers version) – macOS installation

WebLogic Server is offered mainly, in 3 editions: Basic, Standard, and Enterprise. However, in this post, we are not going to enter into the detail of differences between the above editions not to present WebLogic features in detail. What we will do, is show how you can install the WebLogic Server for Developers version 14 (14.1.1.0) on your macOS.

IntelliJ IDEA (Community Edition) – working with Spring Boot
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IntelliJ IDEA (Community Edition) – working with Spring Boot

In this post, we will see how we can add the Spring Intilializr and Assistant plugin and how we can use it to set up our Spring Boot development environment, based on IDEA IntelliJ. Note that it is supposed that you have already installed IDEA IntelliJ on your machine and you have gained enough familiarity with it.